Victims of crime

Published

1. Main facts and figures

  • in the year ending March 2019, 15% of people aged 16 and over said they had been the victim of a crime at least once in the last year
  • this was a decrease compared with the year ending March 2014, when the figure was 17%
  • younger people were more likely to say they were victims of crime than older people (on average for the 3 years from April 2014 to March 2017)
Things you need to know

These figures come from the annual Crime Survey for England and Wales. The survey asks people about their experiences of crime in the previous 12 months.

Surveys are completed in person and respondents have to be 16 and over.

Respondents can give details of any crimes they experienced, not only those they reported to the police.

The data measures whether someone was either:

  • a victim of at least one crime
  • a resident of a household that had been subject to at least one household crime (like burglary)

The data does not measure the number of times they were a victim, or the seriousness of any crime.

Some offences including homicide and sexual offences are not included in the main estimates.

Statistics on fraud and computer misuse have been included in crime survey data since the year ending March 2016. But as the data shown here dates back to 2013, the statistics and commentary exclude this type of offence.

The survey does not include:

  • people living in communal establishments (such as care homes, university accommodation and prisons)
  • crimes against commercial or public sector bodies

Reliability

All survey estimates are based on a sample of the population, rather than the whole population. This means there’s a degree of uncertainty which is greater when the number of respondents is small.

There are usually fewer respondents from ethnic minority groups due to the make-up of the general population. As a result, the level of uncertainty is higher for these groups.

The commentary for this data only includes reliable, or statistically significant findings.

Findings are reliable when we are confident they would be similar 19 times out of 20 if we repeated the same survey on other random people.

Differences are reliable if the range of values ('confidence intervals') for the 2 estimates being compared don't overlap.

Breakdowns by gender, age and socio-economic group

Reliable estimates broken down by gender, age and socio-economic group can't be made based on one year's data. This is because of low sample sizes.

Data for the 3 years to March 2017 has been combined to make sure estimates are reliable. The figures shown are averages for this 3-year period, which has not been updated with data for the years ending March 2018 and March 2019.

What the data measures

This data measures the percentage of people who said they had been the victim of at least one crime in the last year. The data is broken down by ethnicity.

These figures are based on information from the Crime Survey for England and Wales. Respondents and their households are designated either as victims or non-victims.

The ethnic categories used in this data

In the analysis By ethnicity over time, estimates are shown for the 18 ethnic groups listed in the 2011 Census.

In the other analyses, the number of people surveyed from some ethnic groups was too small to make reliable generalisations. So estimates are shown only for the following 5 aggregated groups:

  • Asian
  • Black
  • Mixed
  • White
  • Other

2. By ethnicity over time

Percentage of people aged 16 years and over who said they were victims of crime, by ethnicity over time
2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19
Ethnicity 2013/14 % 2013/14 Sample size 2014/15 % 2014/15 Sample size 2015/16 % 2015/16 Sample size 2016/17 % 2016/17 Sample size 2017/18 % 2017/18 Sample size 2018/19 % 2018/19 Sample size
All 17 35,371 16 33,350 15 35,324 14 35,420 14 34,715 15 34,163
Asian 19 1,824 16 1,649 18 1,790 15 1,956 16 2,013 15 2,078
Bangladeshi 17 138 12 123 15 135 19 168 18 182 11 215
Chinese 15 169 11 136 16 173 13 182 15 165 14 185
Indian 20 767 14 679 18 722 15 772 16 795 14 787
Pakistani 20 398 22 388 23 428 16 498 18 495 17 510
Asian other 15 352 14 323 15 332 13 336 14 376 9 62
Black 17 959 18 902 19 902 17 1,026 15 968 16 930
Black African 16 564 19 529 19 530 17 629 15 581 17 585
Black Caribbean 17 350 15 316 16 311 14 318 16 323 16 283
Black other withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 45 28 57 31 61 22 79 12 64 9 62
Mixed 27 339 28 309 21 364 20 370 22 375 19 372
Mixed White/Asian 24 80 28 90 16 94 17 105 29 87 12 90
Mixed White/Black African withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 46 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 45 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 44 13 56 16 63 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 49
Mixed White/Black Caribbean 29 120 29 98 21 135 20 121 16 120 23 123
Mixed other 29 93 23 76 26 91 29 88 26 105 25 110
White 17 31,980 16 30,212 15 31,967 14 31,673 14 31,003 15 30,424
White British 17 30,073 16 28,476 15 29,993 14 29,366 14 28,714 15 28,040
White Irish 21 322 17 299 17 287 10 296 12 295 13 304
White Gypsy/Traveller withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 12 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 10 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 15 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 21 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 15 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 10
White other 17 1,573 19 1,427 16 1,672 14 1,990 15 1,979 17 2,070
Other 14 236 15 234 17 242 15 349 17 300 15 285
Arab 10 88 10 83 10 87 18 141 20 100 21 96
Any other 16 148 17 151 21 155 12 208 15 200 11 189

Download table data for ‘By ethnicity over time’ (CSV) Source data for ‘By ethnicity over time’ (CSV)

Summary of Victims of crime By ethnicity over time Summary

The data shows that:

  • in the year ending March 2019, 15% of people aged 16 and over in England and Wales said they were a victim of a least one crime in the last year
  • this was a decrease compared with the year ending March 2014, when the figure was 17%
  • the percentage of people who said they were victims of crime ranged from 15% in the Asian, White and Other ethnic groups to 19% in the Mixed ethnic group
  • over the 6 years covered, the percentage of White people who said they were victims of crime went down from 17% to 15%
  • although the data shows changes in other ethnic groups, these are not reliable because of the smaller number of people surveyed

3. By ethnicity and gender

Percentage of people aged 16 years and over who said they were victims of crime, by ethnicity and gender
All Men Women
Ethnicity All % All Sample size Men % Men Sample size Women % Women Sample size
Asian 16 5,395 16 2,651 16 2,744
Black 18 2,830 18 1,179 17 1,651
Mixed 23 1,043 21 438 25 605
White 15 93,852 15 42,755 14 51,097
Other 15 825 17 429 14 396

Download table data for ‘By ethnicity and gender’ (CSV) Source data for ‘By ethnicity and gender’ (CSV)

Summary of Victims of crime By ethnicity and gender Summary

The data shows that:

  • in the 3 years to March 2017, White men (15%) were more likely than White women (14%) to say they were victims of crime in the last year
  • women from Mixed ethnic backgrounds (25%) were more likely to say they were victims of crime than men and women from other ethnic groups
  • differences between men and women in other ethnic groups are not reliable because of the smaller number of people surveyed

4. By ethnicity and age group

Percentage of people aged 16 years and over who said they were victims of crime, by ethnicity and age group
Asian Black Mixed White Other
Age group Asian % Asian Sample size Black % Black Sample size Mixed % Mixed Sample size White % White Sample size Other % Other Sample size
16-24 15 582 23 264 27 215 22 6,333 12 103
25-34 19 1,372 20 546 25 274 19 12,695 14 191
35-44 16 1,540 17 723 23 225 17 14,070 22 226
45-54 18 822 19 656 22 152 16 16,191 14 128
55-64 13 546 13 340 13 90 12 15,594 14 87
65-74 14 359 6 168 3 55 8 16,174 8 62
75+ 9 174 7 133 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 32 5 12,795 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 28

Download table data for ‘By ethnicity and age group’ (CSV) Source data for ‘By ethnicity and age group’ (CSV)

Summary of Victims of crime By ethnicity and age group Summary

The data shows that, in the 3 years to March 2017:

  • in general, younger people were more likely than older people to say they had been the victim of a crime in the last 12 months
  • among the White, Black and Mixed ethnic groups, the experience of being a victim of crime went down as age increased
  • 16 to 24 year olds from the Mixed (27%), Black (23%) and White (22%) ethnic groups were more likely to be a victim of crime than people in the same age group from the Asian (15%) and Other (12%) ethnic groups
  • differences between other ethnic groups and age groups are not reliable because of the smaller number of people surveyed

5. By ethnicity and socio-economic group

Percentage of people aged 16 years and over who said they were victims of crime, by ethnicity and socio-economic group
Asian Black Mixed White Other
Socio-economic group Asian % Asian Sample size Black % Black Sample size Mixed % Mixed Sample size White % White Sample size Other % Other Sample size
Managerial and professional occupations 19 1,748 20 829 28 368 15 32,782 18 221
Intermediate occupations 17 1,079 17 488 20 212 14 22,252 16 149
Routine and manual occupations 15 1,461 18 1,041 22 300 14 32,947 16 222
Never worked and long-term unemployed 15 620 11 216 18 53 17 2,864 18 108
Full time students 14 433 20 221 21 104 21 2,380 8 118
Not classified 7 54 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 35 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 6 11 627 withheld because a small sample size makes it unreliable 7

Download table data for ‘By ethnicity and socio-economic group’ (CSV) Source data for ‘By ethnicity and socio-economic group’ (CSV)

Summary of Victims of crime By ethnicity and socio-economic group Summary

The data shows that, in the 3 years to March 2017:

  • White people in long-term unemployment (17%) were more likely to say they had been victims of crime than White people in ‘routine and manual’ jobs (14%), ‘intermediate’ jobs (14%) and 'managerial and professional' jobs (15%)
  • Black people in 'managerial and professional' (20%) and 'routine and manual' jobs (18%) were more likely to be victims of crime than Black people in long-term unemployment (11%)
  • White full-time students (20%) were more likely to be victims of crime than students from the Asian (14%) and Other ethnic groups (8%)
  • among people in ‘managerial and professional’ jobs, 28% of people from Mixed ethnic backgrounds said they were victims of crime, the highest percentage out of all ethnic groups
  • among people in ‘routine and manual’ jobs, people from Mixed ethnic backgrounds (22%) were more likely to be victims of crime than White people (14%)
  • differences between other ethnic and socio-economic groups are not reliable because of the smaller number of people surveyed

6. Methodology

The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) involves a structured interview. Interviews usually take place in respondents' homes.

The survey covers around 35,000 households every year. Respondents have to be 16 and over.

In the year ending March 2019, 70% of respondents completed the survey (compared with 73% the year before).

Weighting:

Weighting has been applied to the raw data to compensate for:

  • some addresses being more likely to be selected than others (given that some areas are more populated than others)
  • the difference in response rates between different types of neighbourhood
  • cases where only one residence can be selected in households with more than one
  • different probabilities of a respondent being selected based on different sized households
  • different response rates between different areas and age groups

Read more about how weighting is used to make samples more representative of the population.

Socio-economic groups:

The analysis By ethnicity and socio-economic group uses the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification. This categorises adults according to their occupational status.

Suppression rules and disclosure control

Estimates based on fewer than 50 respondents are not shown because they are not reliable.

Rounding

Estimates in the charts and tables are given to the nearest whole number.

You can see more detailed estimates (rounded to 1 decimal place) if you download the data.

Quality and methodology information

Further technical information

The Crime Survey for England and Wales is based on a sample of the population. Because of this, estimates have quantifiable and non-quantifiable errors associated with them.

Non-quantifiable errors include:

  • respondents recalling crimes that occurred outside the reference period
  • respondents not mentioning a crime (because they didn't want do or they forgot to)
  • respondents saying they reported crimes to police when they didn't
  • the interviewer miscoding some responses

7. Data sources

Source

Type of data

Survey data

Type of statistic

National Statistics

Publisher

Office for National Statistics

Publication frequency

Yearly

Purpose of data source

The main aim of the Crime Survey for England and Wales is to:

  • measure people's experience of crime
  • give reliable estimates about changes over time

The survey doesn't include all crimes. It excludes 'victimless' crimes (like possession of drugs) and crimes that victims can't report (like murder).

The survey aims to give a clearer picture of the extent of crime than police statistics. It can do this by including crimes that are not reported to (or recorded by) the police.

It can also provide a better indicator of long-term trends because it isn't affected by changes in how crimes are reported or recorded.

8. Download the data

Victims of crime - Spreadsheet (csv) 138 KB

This file contains the following: Measure, Ethnicity, Time, Geography, Gender, Age, Socio-economic classification, Household income, Value, Sample size, Standard error, Lower CI, Upper CI